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PublicatienummerUS3881388 A
PublicatietypeVerlening
Publicatiedatum6 mei 1975
Aanvraagdatum11 dec 1973
Prioriteitsdatum11 dec 1973
PublicatienummerUS 3881388 A, US 3881388A, US-A-3881388, US3881388 A, US3881388A
UitvindersMccracken George T
Oorspronkelijke patenteigenaarKing Musical Instr Division Of
Citatie exporterenBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Externe links: USPTO, USPTO-toewijzing, Espacenet
Bifurcated valve structure
US 3881388 A
Samenvatting
A valve structure for a musical instrument includes a valve body having first and second chambers therein and first and second rotors disposed, respectively, in the first and second chambers. The first chamber includes a first inlet and a first outlet and the second chamber includes a second inlet and a second outlet. A passageway is provided for interconnecting the first and second chambers. The first and second rotors have first and second positions for controlling the flow of sound through the valve structure. The configuration of the valve body is such that the inlets and outlets for each of the chambers are maintained 120 DEG apart to improve the acoustical flow of sound through the valve by maintaining regularly shaped passageways through the valve structure.
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I United States Patent 1 [111 3,881,388 McCracken May 6, 1975 [5 BIFURCATED VALVE STRUCTURE 3,554,072 1/1971 l-larsbrunner 84/390 Inventor: George T Mccracken, Mayfield 3,641,863 2/1972 Kanstul et a1 84/390 Village, Ohio Primary ExaminerJoseph W. Hartary [73] Assrgnee: King Musical Instruments, Division Assistant v w Miska of the Seeburg Corporation of Attorney, Agent, or FirmMarvin L. Union Delaware, Eastlake, Ohio [22] Filed: Dec. 11, 1973 [57] ABSTRACT [2]] Appl' 423733 A valve structure for a musical instrument includes a valve body having first and second chambers therein [52] US. Cl 84/388; 84/390 and fir and Second rotors disposed, respectively, in [51] Int. Cl. G10d 9/04 the first and second ch mber The first chamber in- [58] Field of Search 84/388-390 cludes a fi inlet n a r t u l nd th e n chamber includes a second inlet and a second outlet. [56] Ref re c Cit d A passageway is provided for interconnecting the first UNITED STATES PATENTS and second chambers. The first and second rotors have first and second positions for controlling the flow 84,390 of sound through the valve structure. The configura- 343Z889 6/1886 Conn tion of the valve body is such that the inlets and out- 670,365 3/1901 lets for each of the chambers are maintained 120 1,178,030 4 191 seidel apart to improve the acoustical flow of sound through 1,178,330 4/1916 Maurey 1. the valve by maintaining regularly shaped passageways 1,72 ,5 8 1 9 C0u uri r--. through the valve structure. 1,823,838 1/1931 Milette 3,175,449 3/ 1965 Kravka 84/390 5 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures 58 l- 73 6'6 1 i c g 3 a I BIFURCATED VALVE STRUCTURE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a new and improved valve structure for a musical instrument and more particularly, to a valve structure which minimizes acoustical distortion as sound passes through the valve structure.

Valves for controlling the flow of sound through a musical instrument are known and one of the most commonly utilized valve structure is disclosed in the Charlton US. Pat. No. 1,708,259 and FIG. 1 hereof. It can be seen that the cross-sectional area of the passageways through the valve is smaller than that of the tubing directing the sound to the valve. Moreover, the sound must abruptly change directions when passing from the tubing through the valve. The reduction of the crosssectional area of the flow path for the sound and the abrupt change in direction of the flow path plus the irregularities associated with the contour of the flow path diminish the acoustical properties of the valve. Thus, the quality of the tone of the sound directed through the valve decreases.

Attempts to overcome the acoustical deficiencies associated with prior art valves have lead to the design of valves such as disclosed in the Kravka US. Pat. No. 3,l75,449. Kravka attempts to design a valve which eliminates the problems due to irregular passageways through the valve and the abrupt reduction of crosssectional area where the tubing is connected to the valve. However. valves such as that shown in Kravka tend to be very complex and hence undesirable due to difficulties encountered when manufacturing such valves and their high costs.

SUMMARY OF THE PRESENT INVENTION The present invention relates to a valve for use in a musical instrument including a valve body, first and second chambers located in a valve body, first and second rotors mounted for rotation in the first and second chambers, respectively. The valve body includes a first inlet for directing sound into the first chamber, a first outlet for directing sound out of the first chamber, a second inlet for directing sound into the second chamber, a second outlet for directing sound out of the second chamber and a passageway means interconnecting the first and second chambers to provide for the flow of sound therebetween. The first rotor has a first position providing for the flow of sound through the first chamber from the first inlet to the passageway means and a second position providing for the flow of sound through the first chamber from the first inlet to the first outlet. The second rotor has a first position providing for the flow of sound through the second chamber from the passageway means to the second outlet and a second position providing for the flow of sound from the first outlet to the second inlet and through the second chamber to the second outlet.

Another provision of the present invention is to provide a valve means for use in a musical instrument for directing the flow of sound through one of first and second paths through the instrument. The vahge means includes a first chamber, a first rotor disposed in the first chamber, a second chamber and a second rotor disposed in the second chamber. The first chamber includes a first inlet and first and second outlets and the second chamber includes first and second inlets and a first outlet. A first connector means is provided to connect the first outlet of the first chamber and the first inlet of the second chamber and a second connector means is provided for connecting the second outlet of the first chamber and the second inlet of the second chamber.

Still another provision of the present invention is to provide a valve means for use in a musical instrument as set forth in the preceding paragraph wherein the first and second rotors have a first condition in which the first rotor directs sound from the first inlet of the first chamber to the first outlet of the first chamber and through the first connector means and the second rotor directs sound from the first inlet of the second chamber to the first outlet of the second chamber. The first and second rotors have a second condition for directing sound from the first inlet of the first chamber to the second outlet of the first chamber and through the second connecting means to the second inlet of the second chamber. When the second rotor is in the second condition sound is directed from the second inlet of the second chamber to the first outlet of the second chamber.

A further provision of the present invention is to provide a valve means for use in a musical instrument for directing the flow of sound through the instrument including a valve body, a chamber located in the valve body and a rotor disposed in the chamber for directing the flow of sound therethrough. First, second, and third passageway means are spaced apart approximately l20 about the valve body for providing for the flow of sound through the valve body and the chamber. The rotor has a first position for providing for the flow of sound through the chamber between a first pair of the first, second, and third passageways and a second position providing for the flow of sound through the chamber and between a second pair of the first, second, and third passageways. The configuration of the valve body with the passageway means spaced apart l20 improves the acoustical properties of the valve means by maintaining regularly shaped passageways through the valve.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional view of a prior art valve.

FIG. 2 is an'exploded side view of the valve of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a top view of the valve taken approximately along the lines 3-3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view taken approximately along the lines 4-4 of FIG. 2 and illustrating the first and second rotors in their first position.

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view similar to FIG. 4 but illustrating the first and second rotors in their second or actuated position.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The advantages associated with the present invention can be better understood by first considering the prior art construction, which is illustrated schematically in FIG. 1. The prior art valve 10 illustrated in FIG. 1 includes a valve body 12 and a rotor 14 for controlling the flow of sound through the valve body. The valve body 10 includes a pair of inlets l6 and 22 and a pair of outlets l8 and 20. When the rotor 14 is in its position illustrated in FIG. 1 sound directed to the inlet 16 will be directed through the body of the valve 12 by the rotor 14 to the outlet 18. As is well known in the art. when the rotor 14 is actuated, the rotor 14 will rotate 90 from its position shown in FIG. 1. The rotor 14 will then act to direct sound from the inlet 16 of the valve 10 to the outlet 20. A passageway in the form of the tubing 24 is provided for connecting the outlet 20 and the inlet 22 in a well known manner. Thus, when the rotor 14 is actuated the sound passing from the outlet 20 will be directed by the tubing 24 to the inlet 22 where the sound will be directed through the valve body 12 by the rotor 14 and through the outlet 18. The passage of sound through the loop (not illustrated) formed by the tubing 24 changes the pitch of the sound in a well known manner.

It should be appreciated that the construction of the prior art valve 10 illustrated in FIG. 1 is such that the cross-sectional area of the flow path for the sound through the musical instrument decreases as the sound is directed through the valve 10. This can be illustrated by comparing the cross-sectional area of the tubing 26 which directs the sound to the inlet 16 of the valve with the cross-sectional area of the flow path through the valve 10. It can be seen that the tubing 26 is necked down at the point where it is connected to the inlet 16. This provides a decrease in the cross-sectional area of the flow path for the sound. Moreover, since the valve body 12 includes four inlets and outlets, the inlets and outlets are spaced apart around the axis of rotation of the rotor 14 by approximately 90. As a result the flow path of the sound as it is directed through the valve 10 is subject to abrupt changes in directions and a reduction in the cross-sectional area of the flow path. The abrupt changes in the direction of the flow path and the irregularities in the flow path such as is caused by the smaller diameter inlet 16 and outlet 18 affects distortion of the sound as it is directed through the valve 10. It can also be seen that as the sound is directed through the valve I the cross-sectional area of the flow path decreases as the sound is directed through the inlet 16 and then increases again as it passes through the outlet 18. This is caused by the rotor configuration due to the fact that the rotor 14 must be operable to control the flow of sound through two inlets and two outlets. The changes in the cross-sectional area of the flow path diminishes the quality of the tone as it passes through the valve.

It can also be seen from the prior art construction illustrated in FIG. 1 that the flow path of the sound through the valve is drastically altered by changing the position of the rotor 14. When the rotor is in the position illustrated in FIG. 1 the sound travels once through the valve 10 as it is directed from the inlet 16 to the outlet 18. However, when the rotor 14 is actuated and rotated 90 from its position illustrated in FIG. 1, the flow path of the sound is directed through the valve 12 twice, i.e., once from the inlet 16 to the outlet 20 and once through the inlet 22 to the outlet 18. The passage of the sound twice through the valve body 12 further diminishes the acoustical properties of the valve and makes it extremely difficult to compensate for these diminished acoustical properties due to the fact that when the valve is in one condition the sound passes through the valve 10 once and when the valve is in its actuated condition the sound passes through the valve body 12 twice. Thus, the compensation procedures to compensate for the poor acoustical properties of the valve need to be doubled when the valve is in its actuated position relative to when the valve is in its unactuated condition as is illustrated in FIG. 1.

The valve 30 of the present invention as is illustrated in FIGS. 2-5 attempts to alleviate the detrimental acoustical properties of the prior art valves by maintaining a more nearly uniform cross-sectional area for the flow path of sound through the instrument and the valve and by reducing the abrupt changes in direction associated with the flow of sound through the prior art devices. To this end, FIG. 2 illustrates a valve structure 30 which is formed from a first valve case 32 and a second valve case 34. The valve cases 32 and 34 define chambers 36 and 38, respectively, as is more fully illustrated in FIG. 4. The chamber 36 includes a rotor 40 disposed therein and the chamber 38 includes a rotor 42 disposed therein. The construction and operation of the rotor 42 disposed in the chamber 38 is analogous to the construction of the rotor 40 disposed in the chamber 36 and accordingly only the construction and operation of the rotor 42 will be described in detail.

The rotor 42 as is illustrated in FIG. 2 is supported for rotation on a valve stem 44. The bottom end of the valve stem 44 is supported by a bearing 46 which is held in place on the lower portion of the valve casing 34 by a valve cap 48. The valve cap 48 is adapted to be threadably engaged with the threaded portion 50 disposed on the lower portion of the valve casing 34. When the valve cap 48 is engaged with the threaded portion 50 of the casing 34, the valve cap 48 supports the bearing 46 and the rotor 42 within the casing 34. When the rotor 34 is disposed within the casing 34, the upper portion of the valve stem 44 extends through an opening 52 in the upper portion of the valve casing 34 and is adapted to engage with an actuator assembly 54. To this end the upper portion of the valve stem 44 includes a threaded recess 60 for threadably engaging with the bolt 58 of the actuator assembly 54.

The actuator assembly 54 includes a limit arm 56 which is secured to the upper portion of the valve stem 44 by the bolt 58. Rotation of the limit arm 56 will effect rotation of the rotor 42. A limit plate 62 is suitably secured to the top portion of the casing 48 by a pair of bolts 64. The limit plate 62 includes a pair of bumpers 66 and 68 attached thereto which are operable to limit rotation of the rotor 42. To this end, the limit arm 56 includes a stop member 70 which is adapted to engage with the bumpers 66 and 68 when the rotor 42 is rotated. Rotation of the rotor 42 and limit arm 56 in a counterclockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 3 effects engagement of the stop member 70 with the bumper 66 to position the rotor 42 in its position shown in FIG. 4. Actuation of the rotor 42 by the actuator assembly 54 effects rotation of the rotor 42 and the limit arm 56 in a clockwise direction as it is viewed in FIG. 3 to effect engagement of the stop member 70 with the bumper 68. This positions the rotor 42 in its position illustrated in FIG. 5.

The valve casing 32 includes-a similar actuator assembly 72 for effecting rotation of the rotor 40. The actuator assembly 72 includes a limit arm 74 having a stop member 76 disposed at one end thereof. A limit plate 78 is suitably secured to the top of the valve casing 34 by the bolts 80 and includes a pair of bumpers 82 and 84 disposed thereon. The bumpers 82 and 84 cooperate with the stop member 76 to limit rotation of the rotor 40 in the casing 32. When the rotor 40 is in its unactuated condition, i.e., when it is fully rotated in a clockwise direction, the stop member 76 engages with the bumper 82 and the rotor 40 assumes its position illustrated in FIG. 4. When the rotor 40 is actuated. by rotation of the actuator mechanism 72 in a counterclockwise direction, the stop member 76 will engage with the bumper 84 to position the rotor 40 in its position illustrated in FIG. 5. The positioning of the rotors 40 and 42 controls the flow of sound through the valve as will be described more fully hereinbelow.

A suitable actuator mechanism, not illustrated, can be interconnected to the actuator assemblies 54 and 72 to control the angular displacement of the rotors 40 and 42. The actuator mechanism may be spring loaded to bias the actuator assemblies 54 and 72 to their positions ilustrated in FIG. 3. In this position the actuator mechanism biases the stop member 76 in a clockwise direction into engagement with the bumper 82 to position the rotor 40 in its position illustrated in FIG. 3 and biases the stop member 70 in a counterclockwise direction into engagement with the bumper 66 to position the rotor 42 in its position illustrated in FIG. 3. When the actuator mechanism is actuated by overriding the spring force associated therewith the rotor 40 will be rotated in a counterclockwise direction until the stop member 76 engages with the bumper 84 and the rotor 40 is disposed in its position illustrated in FIG. 5 and the rotor 42 will be rotated in a clockwise direction until the stop member 70 engages with the bumper 68 and the rotor 42 is disposed in its position illustrated in FIG. 5. It should be apparent that the rotors 40 and 42 will be simultaneously rotated by the actuator mechalllSm.

The valve casing 32 includes a first inlet 90 and a first outlet 92 and the valve casing 34 includes a second inlet 96 and a second outlet 98. The inlets 90 and 96 and the outlets 92 and 98 have suitable tube connectors 94 attached thereto for receiving tubing from the musical instrument in a well known manner. A passageway 100 is provided for interconnecting the chamber 36 disposed in the valve casing 32 and the chamber 38 disposed in the valve casing 34. To this end suitable openings 102 and 104 are provided in the valve casings 32 and 34, respectively, to enable the passageway 100 to provide communication between the chambers 36 and 38.

When the valve is in its unactuated position the rotors 40 and 42 will be disposed in their position illustrated in FIG. 4. In this position the rotor 40 will direct the flow of sound from the inlet 90 of the casing 32, through the chamber 36 and through the opening 102 to the passageway 100. The passageway 100 will then direct the sound through the opening 104 in the valve casing 34 and to the chamber 38 where the rotor 42 will direct the sound out of the outlet 98 of the valve casing 34. When the rotors 40 and 42 are actuated they will assume their position illustrated in FIG. 5. In the actuated position the sound will be directed from the inlet 90 of the valve casing 32 into the chamber 36 wherein the rotor 40 will direct the sound out of the outlet 92. The outlet 92 of the valve casing 32 is normally connected via tubing, not shown, to the inlet 96 of the casing 34. Thus, sound passing from the outlet 92 of the valve casing 32 will be directed through the tubing, not illustrated, to the inlet 96 of the casing 34 and into the chamber 38. The sound will then be di- 6 rected by the rotor 42 to the outlet 98 of the valve casing 34.

The passage of sound through the tubing which connects the outlet 92 and the inlet 96 will change the pitch of the tone in a well known manner when the valve 30 is actuated. Thus, the valve 30 controls the flow of sound through a first flow path illustrated in FIG. 4 when it is in its unactuated condition and through a second flow path, illustrated in FIG. 5, when it is in its actuated condition.

It can be seen that each chamber 36, 38 in the valve 30 contains three openings therein, i.e., chamber 36 includes openings 90, 92 and 102 and chamber 38 includes openings 104, 96 and 98. This is in contrast to the prior art valves wherein four openings are provided for each chamber. Since only three openings are provided the openings may be arranged 120 apart as is illustrated in the Figures. This provides a flow path for the sound wherein abrupt changes in the direction of the flow path of the sound are minimized. This is due to the fact that within each valve casing 32, 34, the sound never changes direction through an angle more than 60. Moreover, since three rather than four openings are provided for each chamber, the cross-sectional configuration of the openings can be controlled so as to minimize any reduction in the cross-sectional area of the flow path into the valve. This eliminates distortion of the sound as it passes through the valve. It should also be apparent that since the openings to the chambers in the valve casings 32 and 34 are disposed 120 apart, the bore through the rotors 40 and 42 can be maintained the same size as the valve ports and the diameter of the tubing. This, of course, further reduces acoustical irregularities due to changes in the crosssectional area of the valve.

When sound is directed through the valve 30, the sound always passes once through the chamber 36 disposed in the casing 32 and once through the chamber 38 disposed in the casing 40. This is in contrast to the prior art devices such as illustrated in FIG. I wherein when the valve is in one condition the sound passes through the chamber in the valve once and when the valve is in another position the sound passes through one side of the chamber in one direction and then back again through the other side of the chamber in the opposite direction. Accordingly, since the sound always passes through the chambers 36 and 38 only once, variances in tone distortion effected by changing the condition of the valve will be eliminated. In other words, since the sound always flows through the same chambers the same number of times, any distortion which might occur in the valve will be uniform regardless of whether the valve is in its actuated or unactuated condition.

While the valve casings 32 and 34 have been illustrated as comprising a unitary valve structure 30, it should be apparent that the passageway could be extended so that the valve casings 32 and 34 assume a spaced apart relationship relative to each other.

From the foregoing it should be appreciated that a new and improved valve structure for a musical instrument has been provided. The valve structure includes a pair of valve casings each of which define a chamber therein. A rotor is provided in each of the chambers to direct the flow of sound therethrough. The valve includes a first inlet, a first outlet, a second inlet and a second outlet. A passageway is provided to interconnect the first and second chambers. The rotors have a first condition in which sound is directed from the first inlet through the passageway means to the second outlet. The rotors have a second position in which the flow of sound is directed from the first inlet to the first outlet and from the first outlet to the second inlet and to the second outlet The construction of the valve is such as to maintain the cross-sectional area of the flow path substantially equal through the tubing and the valve while minimizing abrupt changes in direction of the flow path of the sound to thereby provide a valve which eliminates acoustical irregularities and provides a tone of superior quality to that known in the prior art.

I now claim:

l. A valve for use in a musical instrument for controlling the flow of sound through the instrument comprising, a unitary block valve body, first and second chambers adjacently located in said unitary block valve body, a first valve stem, a first rotor mounted for rotation on said first valve stem in said first chamber, a second valve stem, a second rotor mounted for rotation on said second valve stem in said second chamber, a first inlet for directing sound into said unitary block valve body and into said first chamber disposed therein, a first outlet for directing sound out of said first chamber and out of said unitary block valve body, a second inlet for directing sound into said unitary block valve body and into said second chamber disposed therein, a second outlet for directing sound out of said second chamber and out of said unitary block valve body, and passageway means disposed in said unitary block valve body connecting said first and second chambers to provide for the flow of sound therebetween, a first actuator assembly connected to said first valve stem for effecting rotation of said first rotor between a first position providing for the flow of sound from said first inlet through said first chamber, through said passageway means to said second chamber and a second position providing for the flow of sound from said first inlet through said first chamber to said first outlet, a second actuator assembly connected to said second valve stem for effecting rotation of said second rotor between a first position providing for the flow of sound from said first chamber through said passageway means and said second chamber to said second outlet and a second position providing for the flow of sound from said inlet through said second chamber to said second outlet, said first inlet, said first outlet and said passageway means are spaced apart approximately 120 about said first chamber, said second inlet, said second outlet, and said passageway means are spaced apart approximately 120 about said second chamber, said first actuator assembly including a first actuator member and a first pair of stop members, said first actuator member effecting rotation of said first valve stem and said first rotor, said first actuator member includes a stop surface thereon which is operable to engage with one of said first pair of stop members when said actuator member is rotated in a first direction to position said first rotor in said first position and is operable to engage with the other of said first pair of stop members when said first actuator member is rotated in a second direction, opposite said first direction, to position said first rotor in said second position, and said second actuator assembly includes a second actuator member and a second,

pair of stop members, said second actuator member effecting rotation of said second valve stem and said second rotor, said second actuator member includes a stop surface thereon which is operable to engage with one of said second pair of stop members when said second actuator member is rotated in said first direction to position said second rotor in one of said positions and is operable to engage with the other of said second pair of stop members when said second actuator member is rotated in said second direction to position said second rotor in the other of said positions and wherein said first and second actuator assemblies are operable to be simultaneously actuated to effect simultaneous rotation of said first and second rotors.

2. A valve for use in a musical instrument as defined in claim 1 further including first and second arcuate passageways located in said first and second rotors, respectively, for directing sound through said first and second chambers, respectively, said first and second arcuate passageways being operable to change the direction of flow of sound traveling through said first and second chambers, respectively, by approximately 60.

3. A valve for use in a musical instrument as defined in claim 2 wherein said first rotor when in said first position is operable to be rotated in said second direction to said second position and said second rotor when in said first position is operable to be rotated 120 in said first direction, opposite said second direction, to said second position.

4. A valve for use in a musical instrument as defined in claim 2 wherein the cross-sectional area of each of said first and second arcuate passageways is substan tially equal to the cross-sectional area of said inlets and outlets associated with the first and second chambers to minimize acoustical distortion of sound passing through said arcuate passageways.

5. A valve for use in a musical instrument as defined in claim 3 wherein said first arcuate passageway in said first rotor is operable to direct sound from said first inlet to said passageway means when said first rotor is in said first position and is operable to direct sound from said first inlet to said first outlet when said rotor is rotated 120 to its second position and said second arcuate passageway in said second rotor is operable to direct sound from said passageway means to said second outlet when said second rotor is in said first position and is operable to direct sound from said second inlet to said second outlet when said second rotor is rotated 120 to said second position.

Patentcitaties
Geciteerd patent Aanvraagdatum Publicatiedatum Aanvrager Titel
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US143134 *18 juni 187323 sept 1873 Improvement in musical wind-instruments
US343889 *23 nov 188515 juni 1886 Wind-instrument
US670365 *20 okt 190019 maart 1901Buescher Mfg CoWind musical instrument.
US1178030 *31 okt 19144 april 1916William F SeidelValve construction for musical horns.
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US3175449 *13 feb 196330 maart 1965Amati Narodni PodnikBrass wind instrument
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Verwijzingen naar dit patent
Citerend patent Aanvraagdatum Publicatiedatum Aanvrager Titel
US4718318 *16 sept 198612 jan 1988Boy Joseph PFlow path selector valve for use in wind instruments made of metal
US5012714 *19 sept 19897 mei 1991Yamaha CorporationBrass instrument
US5900563 *12 juni 19964 mei 1999Leonard; Brian PhillipCompact rotary valve for brass instruments
WO1991016560A2 *26 april 199131 okt 1991Joseph BoyDevice for controlling flowable media
WO1991016560A3 *26 april 19919 jan 1992Joseph BoyDevice for controlling flowable media
WO1997048091A1 *30 mei 199718 dec 1997The University Of AkronRotary valve for brass instruments
Classificaties
Classificatie in de VS84/388, 984/144, 84/390
Internationale classificatieG10D9/04, G10D9/00
CoŲperatieve classificatieG10D9/04
Europese classificatieG10D9/04
Juridische gebeurtenissen
DatumCodeGebeurtenisBeschrijving
26 sept 1983AS06Security interest
Owner name: GENERAL ELECTRIC CREDIT CORPORATION 880 JOHNSON FE
Effective date: 19830909
Owner name: KING MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, INC., A DE CORP
26 sept 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: GENERAL ELECTRIC CREDIT CORPORATION 880 JOHNSON FE
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:KING MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, INC., A DE CORP;REEL/FRAME:004174/0520
Effective date: 19830909
3 dec 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: CONTINENTAL ILLINOIS NATIONAL BANK AND TRUST COMPA
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:XCOR CORPORATION, A CORP. OF DE;REEL/FRAME:003953/0466
Effective date: 19810619
3 dec 1981AS03Merger
Owner name: CONTINENTAL ILLINOIS NATIONAL BANK AND TRUST COMPA
Owner name: XCOR CORPORATION, A CORP. OF DE
Effective date: 19810619